BEST Old Fashioned Cinnamon Snap Cookies

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cinnamon snap cookies on a cookie sheet
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If you are looking for classic Italian Style Cookies try these: Soft AMARETTI Cookies Sardinian Recipe, Simple Italian Wedding Cookies (Anginetti), Classic Pizzelle Cookies, or Basic Italian Biscotti (Cantucci) Dough

Simple Ingredients

This old-school recipe contains everything you already have in your fridge and pantry.

  • Sugar
  • Eggs
  • Shortening
  • Molasses
  • Milk
  • Flour
  • Baking Soda
  • Cinnamon
  • Salt

BEST Tried and True Cinnamon Snap Recipe

This is another tried and true Davis family recipe that comes from Grandma Sharon Davis. Every Christmas and winter season when we visit the Davis family in Idaho you will find a stash of these in the freezer and I can speak for the entire family- they are a special and favorite cookie loved by all!

cinnamon snap cookies on a cake plate

Where do Snap Cookies get their Name?

A snap cookie is a cookie recipe that is very quick and easy to make, so easy that you can make it in the snap of a finger.

Typically, snap cookies refer to ginger snaps or some type of German cookie flavored with either ginger, molasses and/or cinnamon.

cinnamon snap cookies on a plate

Difference Between Using Butter VS Shortening in Cookies

I normally prefer butter in all recipes and try to ditch the shortening, but trust me, these cookies really need the shortening to give them that classic texture.

Shortening in Cookies

Vegetable shortening is a solid fat made from vegetable oils, like soybean or cottonseed. It was traditionally made by transforming oil to a solid through partial hydrogenation, resulting in trans fats. Now there are shortenings available where the oil undergoes complete hydrogenation instead, resulting in saturated fat instead of trans fat.

Shortening is 100 percent fat, meaning there is no water in it and no steam is created during baking. The lack of water also means that shortening does not increase gluten production, so cookies made with shortening tend to be softer and more tender.

Shortening has a higher melting point, so the flour and eggs in the cookies have extra time to set before the shortening melts, resulting in cookies that are taller and not as flat. It has no real distinct flavor, although butter-flavored shortenings are now available.

Butter in Cookies

Butter is not composed of all fat, though: Butter made in the United States must contain at least 80 percent fat and no more than 16 percent water, whereas European butter generally has a higher fat content of 82 to 85 percent.

This combination of fat and water is what makes butter unique: The heat from the oven during baking turns that water into steam, which can cause more gluten formation, resulting in crisper cookies if baked long enough.

Basics Differences in Butter VS Shortening in Cookies

Basically, cookies made with butter spread more and are flatter and crisper if baked long enough.

Cookies made with shortening bake up taller and are more tender.

Courtesy of: TheKitchn

up close photo of one cookie

If you crave a soft and tender cinnamon molasses cookie, I recommend using 100% shortening for this recipe!

What is Molasses?

Molasses is a by-product that comes from the process of making sugar.

What Does Molasses Taste Like?

Take one big whiff of molasses, and you’ll realize it has a unique smell and flavor.  While molasses is sweet, it also has smoky and bitter notes to it.

Is Molasses Healthy?

Molasses contains several minerals, including calcium, iron, selenium and copper. It also contains a lot of sugar, so be wary.

How can I Measure Molasses Since it is so Sticky?

Here’s a helpful tip for measuring molasses. Spray the inside of your liquid measuring cup with nonstick cooking spray before using.  This allows the molasses to come out quickly and easily. I also use this when measuring honey.

The unique molasses taste gives these cinnamon snap cookies their unique flavor and texture.

Storing (Freezing and Refrigerating)

  • How long can I freeze cinnamon snap cookies? You can freeze them in an airtight container with freezer paper between layers of cookies. Be sure they are completely cooled before storing. They will store nicely for up to 2 months. This is a great cookie to make in advance.
  • Do I have to refrigerate the cookies? No, you do not. You can store these in an airtight container at room temperature for about a week.
  • Can I store the cookie dough? Yes, wrap the dough tightly, and you can store it in the refrigerator for 3-5 days. You can then remove the dough, let it come to room temperature, roll it out, cut, and bake.

Cinnamon Snaps pair well with coffee, tea, or milk. They are flavorful and simply delicious.

They make a delicious homemade gift.

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Print
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up close photo of one cookie

5 Stars 4 Stars 3 Stars 2 Stars 1 Star

5 from 2 reviews

Grandma’s Cinnamon Snaps are just like you remember them as a child! These Cinnamon Snaps are a soft molasses cookie that’s big on flavor, chewy, perfectly soft on the inside, and slightly crisp on the outside. Travel back in time as you enjoy this old fashioned molasses cookie recipe from Grandma Sharon Davis.

  • Total Time: 0 hours
  • Yield: 4 dozen 1x

Ingredients

Units Scale
  • 3 cups granulated sugar, (1/2 cup more for rolling cookies)
  • 3 eggs, room temperature
  • 1 1/4 cups shortening (see blog post for why I use it in this recipe)
  • 1/2 cup milk, room temperature 70 degreed F
  • 1/2 cup molasses
  • 6 cups flour
  • 2 teaspoons baking soda
  • 2 teaspoons cinnamon
  • 1 teaspoon salt

Instructions

  1.  Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper and set aside. Prepare a small bowl with the extra 1/2 cup sugar for rolling the cookie dough and set aside. 
  2. In a large mixing bowl cream together the eggs, 3 cups sugar, and shortening until pale yellow and fluffy.
  3.  In a separate bowl sift together flour, baking soda, cinnamon, and salt. Add the dry ingredients to the creamed mixture alternating with the milk and molasses. Mix until well combined. 
  4.  With a small cookie scoop or tablespoon, roll the dough into balls. About 1 inch in diameter. Roll dough in a small bowl of granulated sugar. Bake for 10-12 minutes. Repeat until all the cookie batter is gone. See Notes for storing cookies. 

Notes

  • How long can I freeze these cinnamon snap cookies? You can freeze them in an airtight container with freezer paper between layers of cookies. Be sure they are completely cooled before storing. They will store nicely for up to 2 months. This is a great cookie to make in advance.
  • Do I have to refrigerate the cookies? No, you do not. You can store these in an airtight container at room temperature for about a week.
  • Can I store the cookie dough? Yes, wrap the dough tightly and you can store it in the refrigerator for 3-5 days. You can then remove the dough, let it come to room temperature, roll out, cut and bake.
  • Author: Elena Davis
  • Prep Time: 10 min
  • Cook Time: 10-12 minutes
  • Category: Sweet
  • Method: American
  • Cuisine: American

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About Elena

My dream is to share delicious wholesome recipes that you will share around the table with all your loved ones. The memories surrounded by food are the heart and soul of CucinaByElena.

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5 Comments

  1. Not really a rating but a question. I have a recipe for molasses “crinkles” from my mom. After dipping the cookie into the additional sugar, a couple of drops of water are dripped on to create the “crinkle” like your cracking.
    Also, for 4 dozen cookies that seems like an awful lot of flour and sugar. One recipe, I have has:
    ¾ cup shortening
    1 cup brown sugar, packed
    1 egg
    ¼ cup molasses
    2 ¼ cups All-Purpose flour
    also is for 4 1/2 doz cookies. My mom’s recipe for the Molasses Crinkles are basically the same as that. Just 2 1/4 cups of flour for the 4 doz. Of course, both recipes also have the spices and stuff






    1. I am not sure what you are asking. The quantities are accurate. Please be aware that if you haven’t made this recipe leaving a 3 star review hurts the ratings of my blog and recipe. Next time, leave a comment/questions without devaluing the recipe. Thank you.